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Artist:
Doc Reevez & 2 Hungry Bros.

Album:
Recipe for Disaster

Released:
August 04, 2015

Artist Location:
New York, NY



“A narration sample from John Huston’s 1946 antiwar documentary Let There Be Light about the traumatized soldiers “plunged into sudden and terrible situations” seems to be steering Recipe for Disaster in a political direction in the opening seconds of the album. However, when the beat kicks in and New Jersey’s Doc Reevez starts rhyming, it quickly becomes clear that the allusions to war relate more to the struggles of daily life faced by Reevez (or anyone suffering the human condition for that matter) than to any kind of pointed attack on specific politicians or legislation. Nonetheless, Reevez’s lyrics by their very nature have socially conscious commentary, cloaked in raw street braggadocio. While the entire album feels meticulously structured, with Reevez skillfully maneuvering his rhymes around the beats and samples supplied by Brooklyn’s 2 Hungry Bros., there is a recurring sense that the mentality demonstrated on the album was born of battle rapping and freestyle ciphers. The lead single, “Frun Gru,” features guest verses by Reef The Lost Cauze and K. Gaines who lay out violent, visceral imagery, with Gaines delivering the particularly menacing meta line: “Now I let out aggression by rhyming over beats/ Don’t make me revert back to old techniques.” On the refrain to “Problematic,” Reevez states: “Wake the fuck up/ You steppin’ knee deep in a mess of feces/ Life been hard, death is easy/ You gettin’ sleepy.” In contrast, the more socially conscious voice comes in on “No Evidence” where Reevez muses: “Any pussy on the planet Earth can shoot a gun/ Tryin’ to prove you tough, what the fuck you doin’, son?” On the closing cut, “The Movement,” Reevez demonstrates a sophisticated capacity for metaphysical ponderings and illustrating social problems, angles that have been present in small pieces throughout the album but fully bloom in this thoughtful closing cut.

There are also hooks galore found on Recipe for Disaster. This is in part due to the wide variety of samples expertly employed by the vintage vinyl fanatic production team of 2 Hungry Bros., with an emphasis on melodic passages and memorable instrumental choices, but also due to the aforementioned abilities and instincts of Reevez. He raps to the beat when it befits the feel and against the beat to change things up. On “Kings Landing” he sings the chorus hook in a drawn out manner after rapid fire verses to astounding effect. There is also just enough playful energy to the album between the dialog samples and clever similes (“now you shook like seismographic activity”) that Recipe should win over those skeptical of the more hardcore bravado aspect with its sheer creativity and craft.”
-Peter Cook, Already Dead Tapes, 2015

C63

Edition of 100

Artwork: Pan Pan

Design: Joshua Tabbia